Tara en route for the Panama Canal

© Maéva Bardy / Fondation Tara Expéditions

9 July 2016

Three days since Tara left Miami. Onboard, life resumed the rhythm of navigation at sea. Each person is busy doing his daily work, but the whole crew gathers together for meals, to share household chores, and to do night-watch, monitoring navigation and maritime traffic.

 

CREDITS MAEVA BARDY-TECHNIQUE-SAMUEL AUDRAIN-CABLAGE TIMONERIE-BD-1
Captain Samuel Audrain checks the wiring of the wheelhouse from the main cabin © Maéva Bardy / Tara Expeditions Foundation

 

We are 9 crew members aboard: 6 sailors, 2 scientists and a journalist. The crew is smaller than during the transatlantic crossing. Everyone is expected to participate in the night watch, taking turns to ensure the smooth running of the boat.

 

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Julie Lherault on the boom helping take down the mainsail © Maéva Bardy / Tara Expeditions Foundation

 

The schooner passed the coast of western Cuba last night. To arrive on time at the mouth of the Panama Canal, we maintain a speed of 6.7 knots. Tara will pass through the Canal between July 14th and 15th , a mythical passage in the history of navigation. Once in Panama City the new scientific team will come aboard and on July 16, begin to collect coral samples in the Gulf of Panama.

 

CREDITS MAEVA BARDY-SCIENCES-STEPHANE PESANT-AEROSOLS-BD-1
Stephane Pesant (scientist in charge of data management) prepares the tubes used for preserving aerosol filters © Maéva Bardy / Tara Expeditions Foundation

 

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